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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Edward Snowden
U.S. Senator (I- Vermont),
MSNBCW 09/29/2015
Mitchell: We have breaking news from twitter. Edward Snowden has just created his own twitter account and went live just a few hours ago, in that short time, he's picked up nearly 30,000 followers. Snowden's first tweet was a question, “Can you hear me now?” In case you're wondering, he is following just one other twitter account. That is the NSA.
Edward Snowden
U.S. Senator (I- Vermont),
LINKTV 09/30/2015
Goodman: NSA whistle blower Edward Snowden has made his twitter debut. He’s already, in one day, attracted nearly 1 million followers. His first tweet clearly alluding to NSA spying but also to a Verizon advertisement was
Brent Goff
Anchor, DW News
KCSM 10/06/2015
Goff: On Tuesday, the European Court of Justice ruled that a 15-year-old agreement that regulates the safe transfer of data between EU nations and the U.S. is illegal. The message on the court -- European citizens cannot expect the same data protection rights they enjoy at home to be guaranteed by U.S. companies such as Facebook and Google. Now some say it is a ruling made possible by Edward Snowden's revelations. The law student that brought the case to court agrees. Mohr: The EU's top court ruled the safe harbor agreement between the U.S. and EU did not sufficiently guarantee the personal data of Europeans. It said tech companies cannot simply transfer data across the Atlantic.
Ariane Mohr
Reporter, DW News
KCSM 10/06/2015
Mohr: Data privacy advocates in Europe welcomed the ruling but the White House expressed concerns about its economic consequences. Earnest: We are aware of that ruling and while we are reviewing that ruling, we are disappointed the court has struck down an agreement that since 2000 has proved to be critical in protecting both privacy and fostering economic growth in the United States and European union. Mohr: 15 years ago, Brussels and Washington signed an agreement governing data transfers. But revelations made by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden in 2013 aroused suspicions that U.S. spy agencies gained access to massive troves of personal information. Jourova: The remaining thing that concerns our national security but we still have something to do there. Now after the court ruling, we have a very strong arguments in continuing the negotiations and achieving that results.
Ariane Mohr
Reporter, DW News
KCSM 10/06/2015
Mohr: Participants at the IT Security Fair now underway in Nuremberg also welcomed the ruling in Luxembourg. Trost: It was overdue. U.S. companies that store European user data in the U.S. have to protect that data. Developments in recent years have shown that they’re not doing that. Mohr: For most businesses in Europe, data security is a key priority, but it could take time for consumers to become more aware of potential security risks.
Brent Goff
Anchor, DW News
KCSM 10/06/2015
Goff: Let's start with Edward Snowden. I talked to him. I interviewed him earlier this year and he said the decisions he had made had burned his life to the ground, to quote him. Would you say that this court ruling today maybe turns him into a phoenix who rises out of the ashes? Is he being given a second chance? Meyers: I think what was really clear to us, who worked in the whistleblower protection community for a long time, and these are public interest whistleblowers and GAP has been supporting and defending whistleblowers for nearly 40 years. Is that Edward Snowden's revelations have given the information citizens need to challenge government overreach. This particular decision is deeply important. Right to privacy is deeply linked to freedom of expression and we need a public debate about the limits we need to have.
Brent Goff
Anchor, DW News
KCSM 10/06/2015
They did say the Safe Harbor agreement was agreed to in 2000. A lot of the concerns and the information that Edward Snowden revealed in his whistleblower disclosures showed that world changed in the years after the Safe Harbor agreement and this is really a catch up that is being pushed onto both the regulatory authorities in the EU and obviously it has an impact on the U.S. and trade but we can't have trade without ensuring we have fundamental freedoms of the right to privacy built-in and worked through.
Brent Goff
Anchor, DW News
KCSM 10/06/2015
Goff: The student who brought this case to court said that the ruling means that surveillance, online surveillance is now illegal. Is that true? Meyers: I think for us it would be more that we hope it is the beginning of the end. This is, obviously there is a shakedown through a lot of different legal systems about what this means. Data protection isn’t necessarily easily understood by private citizens, but if we want to ensure that our data is safe from being collected without our knowledge and for reasons that we have not had an open debate about, EU citizens are very, very, they have heightened awareness about their privacy from history and this is something that I think citizens globally need to understand so we can have this debate. It would not have been possible without Edward Snowden's revelations and the way that it’s happened.
Edward Snowden
U.S. Senator (I- Vermont),
LINKTV 10/06/2015
Goodman: National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden says he has offered to go to prison as part a plea deal that would allow him to return to the United States from Russia. But Snowden says the justice department has not contacted him to discuss the potential deal. in an interview with the BBC, Snowden said --
Amy Goodman
Host and Executive Producer for Democracy Now
LINKTV 10/06/2015
Goodman: Meanwhile, activists with the group Intelexit flew a drone over a key NSA complex in Germany Friday. The drone dropped fliers urging employees at the Dagger complex to quit in protest over mass spying.
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